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CATHOOC 

THEOLOGICAL 

UNION 

A T C H I C A G O 



S 



2004 2006 

BULLETIN 



A Word From The Dean 




Dear Friends. 

I am delighted to introduce the 2004-06 Supplement, a companion 
publication to the current Bulletin of Catholic Theological Union 
(CTL'). The details contained in the supplement are the "nuts and 
bolts"" of a seminal change in the way theology is taught at Catholic 
Theological Union. The supplement also introduces the accomplished 
individuals who joined our faculty this year. 



Over the past two years the facult\ of CTU ha\ e been engaged in a 
comprehensive reform of the curriculum and course design. The new 
curriculum and courses reflect our deep commitment to team teaching 
and interdisciplinar} learning. The new curriculum (described in the 
Bulletin) models the union of theological and ministerial disciplines 
and intimately weaves together iheor} and practice. The result is a 
holistic educational experience that provides the theological and 
practical preparation so necessar\ for effecti\ e ministr\ in an 
increasingly global world. 

At the same time, the addition of vibrant new facult}' demonstrates 
CTU's on-going dedication to the essentials of our teaching mission: 
superb scholarship, the mentoring of students, and modeling the 
collaboration of ordained and la\ . 

It is our hope that you w ill discover that Catholic Theological Union is 
matched to the challenge of providing the best in theol ^ical education 
that prepares men and women to live li\ es of witness to Christ's good 
news of justice. lo\e. and peace to all people. 

For more information or for assistance in planning your future, please 
contact our Admissions Office at 773.753.5316 or admissions@ctu.edu. 



Sincerelv. 




Fr. Gar\ Riebe-Estrella. S.\'.D. 
Vice President and Academic Dean 



NEW FACULTY 




Laurie Brink, O.P. 

Assistant Professor of Biblical Studies 

Director of the Biblical Study and Travel Programs 

M.A., Maryknoll School of Theology; Ph.D. Cand., University of 
Chicago 

Laurie Brink investigates the ancient social, religious, 
and cultural world out of which early Christianity 
emerged. Promoting interdisciplinary research, she directs 
a project in which scholars of Roman history, early 
Christianity, and Jewish Studies investigate ancient burial 
practices and the emergence of identifiable Christian 
practices. A former senior staff member for the Combined 
Caesarea Expeditions, she continues her field work in 
archaeology. She is co-author of In This Place: Reflections 
on the Land of the Gospels for the Liturgical Cycles. She is 
a Dominican Sister from Sinsinawa. 




Edmund Kee-Fook Chia 

Assistant Professor of Doctrinal Theology 

MA., University of Maryland; M.A., Catholic University of America; 
Ph.D., University of Nijmegen 

Edmund Chia is a Malaysian of Chinese descent who 
worked in Thailand for eight years for the Federation 
of Asian Bishops' Conferences. As executive secretary 
of the ecumenical and interreligious dialogue office, 
he was the interface between the Catholic church and 
institutions of other Christian and religious traditions 
in Asia. He has lectured widely throughout Asia and 
parts of Europe, especially on issues of Asian and 
contextual theology. His doctoral research on Asian 
theology of dialogue was an intercultural exploration 
of the hermeneutical-critical theological method advanced 
by Edward Schillebeeckx. He is author of Towards 
a Theology of Dialogue: Schilleheeck.\\s Method as Bridge 
between Vatica}i\ Doniinus /esus (uid Asia's FABC 
Theology and editor of Dialogue? Resource Manual 
for CcUholics in Asia. 



CATIIOMC TllKOIXKilCAL UnION 



New Faculty 



Eileen D. Crowley 

Assistant Professor of Word and Worship 

M.A., University of Notre Dame; Ph.D., Union Theological 
Seminary 

Eileen Crowley brings together the interrelated worlds 
of worship, arts, and communications. A liturgical scholar 
and professional communicator, she studies in particular 
how these areas intersect in contemporary worship around 
the world. Her research into the use of multimedia arts 
in worship has led her to develop liturgical, pastoral, and 
aesthetic criteria for the evaluation of media-in-worship 
practices. Catholic and Protestant. Author of numerous 
articles and Liturgical Art in a Media Culture (forthcoming), 
she teaches, speaks, and gives workshops in academic, 
seminary, and church settings. 




Carmen Marie Nanko 

Assistant Professor of Pastoral Ministry 

Director of Field Education 

M.A., D. Min., Catholic University of America 

Carmen Nanko is a Catholic pastoral theologian 
with extensive experience in ministry, teaching, and 
administration. Her teaching and research, which reflect 
on ministry with youth and appreciation for contextual 
theologies, have focused on areas of Catholic social 
teaching, U.S. Hispanic theologies, and on the relationship 
between religion and popular culture. Her ministry 
includes involvement with diverse communities and 
demonstrates commitments to cross cultural endeavors, 
ecumenical cooperation, interfaith relations, and 
mentoring of pastoral ministers and religious educators. 
She is the author of Campus Ministry: Identity, Mission, 
and Praxis. 




A Graduate School of Theology and Ministry 



New Faculty 






Thanh Van Nguyen, S.V.D. 
Associate Professor of New Testament 

M.A., Catholic Theological Union; Ph.D., 
Pontificia Universita Gregoriana 

Applying narrative criticism, Thanh Van Nguyen studies 
the narrative unity of the Gospels and the Acts of the 
Apostles as a whole and analyzes the essential elements 
of the narrative, both from the story itself as well as from 
the way it is told — such as its narration, its literary style 
and point of view, its settings, its characterization, its 
arrangement of the events or plot — in order to discover 
the intention and message of the implied author and the 
anticipated or ideal response of the implied reader. His 
dissertation, a narrative approach to Acts 10, focused on 
the legitimation of the Gentile admission and integration. 
He is a Catholic priest and a missionary in the Society 
of the Divine Word. 




Robin Ryan, C.P. 

Director, ttie IVIaking Connections Initiative 

Adjunct Professor in Systematic Theology 

M. Div., M.A., Catholic Theological Union; Ph.D., 
Catholic University of America 

Robin Ryan is a Passionist priest who has engaged 
in retreat ministry, the teaching of systematic theology, 
and the formation of seminarians and lay women and men 
preparing for ministry. He serves as the director of the 
"Making Connections Initiative" and as an adjunct 
professor in systematic theology. His scholarly interests 
include issues relating to Christology, Christian 
mysticism, and God and human suffering. 



Cathomc Thi;()lo(;k al Union 



COURSE NUMBERING 



The courses contained in this supplement represent those taught at Cathohc Theological 
Union. Actual courses may vary from those listed. The system of letters and numbers 
used for course identification helps the reader identify course characteristics. 

The letter(s) that precede the numbers indicate the field(s) of study and the numbers 
indicate level. A course with a combination of letters satisfies the requirements of each 
area designated. For example, BW is a course that satisfies the requirements for Biblical 
Studies or Word and Worship. 

Letters and field(s) of study: 

8 Biblical Studies 

G Cross-Cultural Studies 

JD Doctrinal Studies 

f Ethical Studies 

H Historical Studies 

/ Interdisciplinary/Integrative Studies 

M Ministerial Studies 

MP Ministry related to Pastoral Ministry 

MW Ministry related to Word and Worship 

P Philosophy Prerequisites 

S Spirituality Studies 

W Word and Worship Studies 

Note: For courses conducted as part of the Biblical Study and Travel 
program, the letter ''V\follows the four-digit number 

The numbers following the letter(s) indicate level of instruction. 

2000 Non-credit prerequisite level course 

4000 Foundational and intermediate level course 

5000 Seminar level course 

6000 Doctor of Ministry seminar level course 



A Graduate School of Theology and Ministry 



Catholic Theological Union 



COURSE OFFERINGS 



Components of the Curriculum 

The graduate theology curriculum has three primary components: 

• The Core Curriculum is comprised of the Foundational, Complementary, and Integrating Cores 
which offer courses based on particular themes. 

• Area Requirements are courses that provide grounding in traditional theological disciplines. 

• Electives are courses that allow further study in particular areas of theology. 

The Foundational Core is identified accordingly: 

FP Foundational Core/Pastoral Practice 

FA Foundational Core/Art of Theology 

FR Foundational Core/Religion in Context 

FT Foundational Core/Tradition 



FOUNDATIONAL CORE COURSES 

(Courses are team taught) 

FP 4000 Pastoral Practice: The Theology of Ministry 

This foundational core course introduces students to critical thinking about ministry as a theological 
act in order to become more effective in ministry. Study the history of ministry, reflect theologically 
on ministerial practice, and focus on several issues in that practice, i.e., the contextual nature of 
ministry, ministry and power, and ministry and embodiment. A theological reflection method for 
ministry is introduced and practiced. 

FA 4000 Art of Doing Theology: Theological Methods 

An interdisciplinary course that introduces the student to various methods of theological analysis 
and is designed to be both experiential and theoretical. 

FR 4000 Religion in Context: Diversity in Dialogue 

This course provides students with an understanding of spirituality, religious experiences, and 
religion in cultural context. It helps students become open to various authentic experiences of God 
and acquire a deeper understanding of the evangelizing/missionary nature of the church. 

FT 4000 Tradition: Sources through History 

This foundational course introduces the nature, breadth, and diversity of the church's tradition within 
the framework of the history of the world Christian movement, from ancient to modern times. Topics 
include: documents, movements, eras, rituals, artifacts, and persons. 



A Graduate School of Theology and Ministry 



Course Offerings 



COMPLEMENTARY CORE COURSES 

(Courses in Pastoral Practice CC-P, Art of Theology CC-A, Religion in Context CC-R. and Tradition CC-T) 

B 4001 Introduction to the Bible (CC-T) 

An introduction to the text and various parts and genres, of the Old and New Testaments, the issues 
arising from these, and relevant interpretive approaches. 

C 4001 Crossing Cultural Boundaries: Ministry at the Margins (CC-R) 

Who are we, what are we doing, and why? Everyone has a particular social location, assumptions, 
and expectations, which they bring to ministry. Examines culture, religion, faith, encounter — and the 
call to conversion — as constitutive of marginal and boundary-breaking ministry. 

C 4002 Abraham's Children: Jews, Christians, and Muslims (CC-R) 

A cross-cultural and comparative introduction to Judaism, Christianity, and Islam using historical, 
theological, and ethnographic methodologies. 

D 4001 Doing Systematic Theology (CC-A) 

This course investigates the nature and methods of systematic theology. After defining theology 
according to Anselm of Canterbury's classic definition of "faith seeking understanding," the course draws 
implications for doing systematic theology in today's context (Part I), and explores how systematic 
theology is done as a communal, ecclesial enterprise, in conversation with Christian tradition and the 
church's teaching office (Part II). It then investigates the various sources of positive theology, surveys 
the methods of speculative theological reflection, and examines various theological texts (e.g., of 
patristic, scholastic, neo-orthodox, or liberation theology) in terms of the methods employed. 

DC 4311 Introduction to Asian Theologies (CC-R) 

As Christianity becomes post-western, the church in Asia has an increasingly significant role in the 
church of the future. This course is an introduction to the theology emerging from the Asian church. 
It begins by looking at the context of Asia and then explores how theology addresses the realities of 
the many poor, many religions, and many cultures of Asia. 

E 4001 Living the Moral Life (CC-A) 

Introduction to the basic themes of the Christian moral life including its personal, social, and cosmic 
dimensions. Using classical texts and contemporary case studies, the course focuses on the 
particular sources, authorities, and methods of the Roman Catholic ethical tradition. Particular 
attention given to the relationship between methods of systematic theology and ethical methods. 

S 4001 Spiritual Companioning for Ministry (CC-P) 

This course provides foundational understanding and experience of being with others within a 
spiritual companioning context. It focuses on the art and ministry of spiritual companioning and the 
practical applications in diverse ministerial settings. Issues such as listening skills, reverence of 
individual differences, and discernment are explored. The course design includes input, discussion, 
and practicum. 

W 4001 Communication Skills for Ministry (CC-P) 

Examines the nature and dynamics of the human communication process as it applies to 1) oral 
interpretation of written texts; 2) rhetorical design and public discourse; 3) the use of mass media; 
4) interpersonal communication; and 5) non-verbal and ritual expressions. Attention is given to the 
cross-cultural and ministerial dimensions of these forms of communication. 



Catholic Theological Union 



Course Offerings 



W 4110 Holy Week: Liturgy, Preaching and Presiding (CC-P) 

This course examines in an integrated faslnion tine liturgical celebrations of Holy Week, specifically 
Passion Sunday and the Triduum. It includes historical and theological study of Holy Week; 
celebration of and mystagogical reflection on the current rites; issues in preparing, preaching, and 
presiding during Holy Week and Triduum; the interplay of liturgical celebration and popular 
religiosity; and reflection on liturgical spirituality fostered through and from the rites. 

INTEGRATING CORE COURSES 

(Courses are interdisciplinary) 

C 4100 Inculturation and Dialogue: Ministry Across Boundaries 

Building upon and integrating previous studies and experiences, this course enables students to 
attend more closely to the contexts in which they minister, particularly when the cultural/social 
contexts and the ideological or faith convictions are not their own. 

DB 4100 Witness and Proclamation: The God of Jesus Christ 

This course has as its content reflection on the God whom Christians proclaim and to whom Christians 
witness in mission and ministry. This God — Holy Mystery — is first manifest in human experience through 
the presence and power of the Holy Spirit, and made visible in the ministry and cross of Jesus of 
Nazareth. The doctrine of God as Trinity is addressed in terms of pastoral practice (P), method (A), 
particu'ar contexts of cultures and religions (R), and the Christian tradition (T). 

EMP 4100 Justice, Peace, the Integrity of Creation and Reconciliation: Living the Values of 
the Reign of God 

Students are introduced to Catholic social teaching and equipped for committed Christian ministry 
with peoples struggling for justice and yearning for reconciliation in an ecologically threatened and 
violent worid. The particular disciplines emphasized are those of social ethics and pastoral ministry. 

WS 4100 Liturgy, Prayer, and Contemplation: Ecclesial Spirituality 

This course helps students integrate and communicate an understanding of individual and 
communal prayer as formation for and the result of apostolic action. Reading, discussion, lecture, 
and practical exercises. 



AREA REQUIREMENTS 

Cross-Cultural Ministries 

Any 4000 lever'C" course 

Doctrine 

D 4200 Christology 

This course provides a systematic treatment of the foundations of Christology in a post-critical 
context. It is concerned with the possibility of constructing and evaluating Christology after one has 
subjected the Bible to the analysis of historical-critical studies, and after one has become thoroughly 
aware of the profound historicity of the Christian faith-community and its doctrines. 

DC 4200 Christology and Culture 

An investigation of the meaning of the person and work of Jesus Christ for Christian faith today. 
Special en^hasis given to emerging christologies in the Worid Church, constructing christologies 
today, and the final consummation of all things in Christ. 



A Graduate School of Theology and Ministjy 



Course Offerings 



D 4201 Ecclesiology 

This course consists of an historical and systematic study of the understanding of the church in the 
Christian tradition and in contemporary thought. Special attention is given to ecclesiological themes 
and issues which are critical for life in the church today. 

History 

Any 4000 level "H" course ' 

Ethics 

Any 4000 level "E" course - 

Pastoral Ministry 

MP 4200 Human Development and Interpersonal Relations for Ministry 

Relying on case studies, various scenarios, and the student's life experiences that illustrate complex 
human dilemmas, this course explores an array of effective and ineffective ministerial actions and 
responses. Included are pertinent readings, engagement in group dialogue and role-play, skills at 
evaluating ministerial practice, and theological reflection. Designed for those seeking an integrative 
vision of pastoral ministry that blends theory and praxis, and offers knowledge for public ministers in 
contemporary practice of pastoral ministry in a variety of settings. 

Spirituality 

Any 4000 level "S" course 

Word and Worship 

W 4200 Sacraments I: Initiation & Reconciliation 

Theological, historical, and pastoral reflection on the experience and sacraments of initiation and 
reconciliation. Particular attention given to: the RCIA as norm for initiatory practice; the relation of 
sacramental reconciliation to the church's life; and foundations of practical skills for celebration. 

W 4201 Sacraments II: Eucharist and Sacramental Theology 

This course serves as a general introduction to sacramental theology, and a particular introduction 
to the Eucharist, its history, theology, structure, and practice. 

W 4202 Presiding Practicum 

A practicum designed for priesthood candidates to develop competency in leadership of sacramental 
rites, including initiation, weddings, anointing, wakes, and funerals. Special emphasis given to 
Eucharist and Reconciliation. Prerequisite: Sacraments I and II 

W4203 Liturgical Preaching 

This practicum examines the homily as a liturgical action within the Christian assembly. Participants 
consider liturgical, pastoral, cultural, and practical dynamics of preaching. 

W 4205 Lay Leadership of Prayer and Preaching 

A practicum to develop competency in the leadership of the community's prayer, including Hours, 
catechumenal rites, the funeral Vigil, penitential liturgies, liturgies of Word and Communion, and 
ministry to the sick and dying. In conjunction with these settings, it also considers the liturgical, 
canonical, and pastoral dynamics and practical skills of lay preaching in catechesis and worship. 
Prerequisite: Sacraments I or II 



10 Catholr Thi:ol(k;icai. Union 



Course Offerings 



PHILOSOPHY STUDIES 

M.Div. and M.A. students can fulfill degree program philosophy requirements by taking the 
appropriate variety of 2000 level non-credit courses offered through the philosophy studies program. 

Philosophy Prerequisites 

P 2100 History of Ancient Philosophiy 

Probes the question of what philosophers do and why. With some treatment of the pre-Socratic 
tradition and the influence of the ancient Asian tradition, the major focus is on the epistemology of 
Plato and the metaphysics and ethics of Aristotle. 

P 2101 History of Medieval Philosoptiy 

Focuses on the interaction between philosophy and theology in the construction of major styles of 
logic and theology from the twelfth to fourteenth centuries. Questions are viewed from the Jewish, 
Islamic, and Christian perspectives with a study of key representatives of these traditions. Vital for 
students considering further studies in patristics. 

P 2102 History of Modern Philosoptiy 

Major figures discussed include Descartes, the English and Continental rationalists, the empiricists, 
Kant, Hegel and Marx, Feurebach, and Nietzsche. Particular emphasis is given to the impact of 
these philosophical positions on the doing of theology. 

P 2103 History of Contemporary Philosophy 

Highlights the issue of language in linguistic analysis, particularly the work of Russell, Ayer, 
Wittgenstein, Husserl, Heidegger, Derrida, and Levinas. Studies the emergence of existential 
phenomenology in Sartre, the process philosophy of V. Whitehead, and emerging contributions of 
contemporary Asian, African, and Latin American philosophical movements. 

P 2180 Philosophy for Future Theologians 

Traces the history of the relationship between theology (faith) and philosophy (reason or the 
intellect). Studies the impact of key philosophical thinkers on the methods and history of theology. 
Introduces students to the growing convergence between philosophers and theologians in the face 
of contemporary issues. Special attention given to the role of scientific methodologies and their 
consequences for the future study of systematic, biblical, and pastoral theology. 

P 2220 Critical Thinking and Applied Logic 

Introductory course focuses on the problem of human knowledge and cognitive claims as responses 
to skepticism. Covers the structure of argument, fallacy detection, and truth analysis. Considers the 
role of logic in shaping worldviews, text books, media coverage, and intercultural epistemology. 

P 2221 Philosophy of the Human Person 

Beginning with Socrates up to Simone De Beauvoir and the cyber-post moderns, explores 
historically the various dimensions of what it means to be human and to know humanity. Considers 
topics such as the will, body-mind dualism, conscience, the ego, sexuality, individual as person, 
action, and the structure of community. 

P 2222 American Philosophy and the History of Social Institutions 

Explores the relationship between American theorists (Peirce, James, Royce, and Dewey) and the 



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Course Offerings 



shaping and maintenance of American cultural and social institutions. Considers the relationship 
between immigrant narratives, their art, and religion in the "American Institution." 

P2223 Philosophy of Art 

Examines the key role of various aesthetical theories and their roles in answering "what is art?" 
Attention is given to the role of criticism, taste, multimedia art, icons, also the non-plastic arts such 
as music, dance, and drama in shaping the expressive dimension of the human person and his or 
her multifaceted, transnational culture. Interaction with various art institutions and artists in Chicago 
is expected. 

P 2300 Philosophical Ethics 

Traditional Catholic ethics has based itself on the history and development of the natural law theory. 
This course traces the development of the human person as ethical subject. Various contemporary 
positions of ethics are also present. Special attention to the thought of Bernard Lonergan and his 
influence on ethical decision making. 

P 2301 Perspectives in the Philosophy of Death 

Starting with the death of Socrates, Jesus, the Buddha, and Mohammed, philosophers have 
considered the question of death and afterlife to be a core metaphysical question. Using 
Heidegger's phenomenological method, explores various cultural, religious, and philosophical 
perspectives concerning death and "the beyond." Explores the "denial of death" in a post holocaust 
world. Asks whether an appropriate philosophy of death necessarily shapes one's philosophy of life. 

P 2302 Issues in Philosophical Hermeneutics 

Surveys the history of hermeneutics and addresses such concepts as the canon in conflicting 
meanings, the role of interpretation, feminist and contextual hermeneutics, the hermeneutics of 
suspicion and generosity, and participatory hermeneutics. Presents the repercussions of the history 
of hermeneutics of contemporary theology. 

P 2303 Philosophy of Science 

Examines the basic structure of scientific method and the major theories of modern physics within 
that context. This is treated with a view to the historical, philosophical and social implications of the 
practice of science in its contemporary form. Special attention is given to the several key 
contemporary scientific theorists, especially Thomas Kuhn. 

P2304 Philosophy of God 

Examines the problem of God, the proofs for God's existence, and the naming of the transcendent 
deity in eastern and western cultures. Using the phenomenological method, explores the 
philosophical structure of thought which underpins the study of theos and logos. 

P 2305 The Phenomenology of Religion 

An introduction to the method of phenomenology as applied to the manifestation of religion. Topics 
such as myth, taboo, the holy, the sacred, the ritual, and sacred texts are presented. The positions 
of Otto, Eliade, van der Leeuw, Malinowski, Smart and Smith, and Durkheim are considered. 
Opportunity to interact with the various religious organizations in Chicago. 

P 2400 Philosophical Texts: Thomas Aquinas 

A detailed study of the key concepts and texts of this important philosopher and theologian. The 
movements of original Thomism and neo-thomism are presented. 



12 Cathoi.ic THKOLOtiicAL Union 



Course Offerings 



P 2401 Philosophical Texts 

Aims at a close reading of the work and life of a major philosophical figure pertinent either to 
classical or contemporary philosophical thought. 

P 2402 Philosophical Texts: International Readings in Political Philosophy 

Analyzes key texts and thinkers that continue to shape the political and socioeconomic thinking of 
western and non-western countries. Considers the relationship between philosophy and democracy, 
culture, methods of social liberation, development, international conflict and peace, minority and 
majority rights. . ' , 



DEPARTMENT OF BIBLICAL LANGUAGES AND LITERATURE (BLL) 

Dianne Bergant, C.S.A., Chair, Barbara Bowe, R.S.C.J., Laurie Brink, O.P., Leslie Hoppe, O.F.M., 
James OI<oye, C.S.Sp., Barbara Reid, O.P., Rabbi David Sandmel, Donald Senior, C.R, 

Thanh Van Nguyen, S.V.D. 

Note: An "I" after the course number indicates the course is taught in Jerusalem as part of the Fall 
Biblical Study and Travel Program. 

8 4001 Introduction to the Bible (CC-T) 

An introduction to the text and various parts and genres, of the Old and New Testaments, the issues 
arising from these, and relevant interpretive approaches. 

DB 4100 Witness and Proclamation: The God of Jesus Christ 

This course has as its content reflection on the God whom Christians proclaim and to whom 
Christians witness in mission and ministry. This God — Holy Mystery — is first manifest in human 
experience through the presence and power of the Holy Spirit, and made visible in the ministry and 
cross of Jesus of Nazareth. The doctrine of God as Trinity is addressed in terms of pastoral practice 
(P), method (A), particular contexts of cultures and religions (R), and the Christian tradition (T). 

B 4300 Hebrew 

An intensive introduction to the grammar, syntax, and vocabulary of biblical Hebrew prepares 
students to translate passages of the Old Testament. 

B 4301 Old Testament Narrative Literature 

An examination of the major narrative sections of the Old Testament. Attention is given to the 
formation of the material, its historical value, its theological importance to ancient Israel, and the role 
it might play in contemporary life and ministry. ■ 

B 4310 Old Testament Prophets 

The course is a study of selected texts from the latter prophets. It focuses on the development of 
the Isaianic tradition and the value of the book of Isaiah for Christian theology and preaching. 

B 4311 The Former Prophets 

A study of selected texts from Joshua to 2 Kings, focusing on the contrast between historical Israel 
and biblical Israel in order to appreciate the theological dimension of ancient Israel's story. 

B 4312 Second Temple Judaism and Early Rabbinic Judaism 

The first part of the course focuses on an examination of the variety of expressions of Judaism in 



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Course Offerings 



the Second Temple period. The second part focuses on the emergence of Rabbinic Judaism in the 
wake of the destruction of the Second Temple in 70 C.E. 

8 4313 Old Testament Poetry 

An investigation of selections from the psalms and the wisdom tradition of the Old Testament, this 
course concentrates on careful reading of the text, the various theological concerns found there, 
and the importance of this material for ministerial practice. 

B 43161 Biblical History and Archaeology: Old Testament 

A study of nonliterary sources for reconstructing ancient Israel's history, this study of the principles 
of archaeology is complemented with visits to archaeological sites and museums in Israel, Greece, 
Turkey, Jordan, and Egypt 

B4400 Biblical Greek 

This intensive introduction to the grammar, syntax, and vocabulary of biblical Greek prepares the 
student to translate passages of the New Testament and early Christian literature. 

B 4402 The Gospel According to Mark 

A study of the Gospel of Mark with attention to its historical, literary, cultural, and theological world. 
The course helps students integrate critical exegetical study of the text with theology, spirituality, 
and pastoral practice for a multicultural church. 

BC 4403 Mark in Cross-Cultural Perspective 

A study of the narrative of Mark from a cultural and theological perspective. Focus is on Markan 
style and theology in dialogue with the Jewish background and with the contexts and questions 
of today. 

B 4404 History and Archaeology of Israel 

The course is a study of the principles of archaeology and an inquiry into some of the nonliterary 
sources for understanding the ancient societies of the Levant. 

B 4405 Gospel According to Matthew 

A study of the Gospel of Matthew with attention to its historical, literary, cultural, and theological 
world. The course helps students integrate critical exegetical study of the text with theology, 
spirituality, and pastoral practice for a multicultural church. 

B 4406 The Gospel According to Luke 

A study of the Gospel of Luke with attention to its historical, literary, cultural, and theological world. 
The course helps students integrate critical exegetical study of the text with theology, spirituality, and 
pastoral practice for a multicultural church. 

B 4407 Gospel According to John 

A study of the Gospel of John with attention to its historical, literary, cultural, and theological world. 
The course helps students integrate critical exegetical study of the text with theology, spirituality, and 
pastoral practice for a multicultural church. 

8 4408 Acts of the Apostles 

A study of the missionary expansion of early Christianity as depicted in Acts of the Apostles. The 
course helps students integrate critical exegetical study of the text with theology, spirituality, and 
pastoral practice for a multicultural church. 

14 Cathoi.ic Thix)ix)(;icai. Union 



Course Offerings 



B 4409 Revelation and Letters of John 

Thematic and exegetical study of the book of Revelation (Apocalypse) and the letters of John from 
the perspectives of history, culture, understanding of church, apocalyptic and epistolary genres, and 
contemporary interpretation. - 

B 4410 Christian Origins and the Pauline l\^ission 

The missionary activity of Paul and his apostolic team is explored through his letters, Greco-Roman 
and Jewish literature, and archaeology tracing the development of the Christian religion as it 
encountered new cultures and adapted to its social environment. 

B 4411 Paul: The Corinthian Correspondence 

A study of 1-2 Corinthians with attention to the historical, literary, cultural, and theological world of 
that time. An examination of the relevance of Paul's pastoral approaches for a contemporary 
multicultural church. 

B 4412 Paul: Galatians and Romans 

A study of Paul's life and world, with attention to the letters to the Galatians and Romans in their 
historical, literary, cultural, and theological context. The relevance of Paul's theological and pastoral 
approaches to the contemporary multicultural church is addressed. 

B 44151 Jesus in Historical Context 

A study of selected texts from the Gospels related to biblical sites visited in the Holy Land. 
Emphasis given to understanding Jesus within the context of first century Palestinian Judaism and 
the social context of first century Galilee and Jerusalem. 

B 44161 Biblical History and Archaeology: New Testament 

An introduction to methods of biblical archaeology for interpreting material remains of early 
Christianity. Classroom study is complemented with visits to archaeological sites. 

B 44171 The Holy City (Israel) 

This course examines the city of Jerusalem in the literature of ancient Israel and early Judaism. 

BW4500 Biblical Hermeneutics for Preaching 

An interdisciplinary course that introduces students to a process of integrating contemplation, 
biblical and theological study, and pastoral praxis for a ministry of preaching. Strongly recommended 
for all M.Div. students. 

8 4501 Gospel Parables 

Study of the dynamics of the parables in the Synoptic Gospels as stories that challenge the hearer 
to conversion. Attention is given to historical, literary, cultural, and theological perspectives and to 
insights for preaching and teaching parabolically. 

BC 4502 Reading the Bible Differently: African-American Biblical Perspectives 

Different contexts and perspectives lead to different approaches to, and interpretation of, the Bible. 
This course studies the interplay between the African-American contexts and the resulting 
appropriation and interpretation of the Bible. Participants are inducted into the wider issue of social 
location in biblical hermeneutics. 

BC 4503 Perspectives in African Biblical Interpretation 

After an introduction into the African culture and context, the approaches, themes, and texts in 



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Course Offerings 



current African biblical interpretation are studied. Participants are introduced to the question of text 
and context in interpretation. 

5 4504 Jesus Through Jewish Eyes 

This course examines the different ways that Jews have related to the figure of Jesus during his life 
(to the extent that can be determined) and throughout the history of Christianity. Also demonstrated 
is the manner in which, at any given time, these attitudes are related to the state of Jewish-Christian 
relations. 

BS 4520 Biblical Foundations of Spirituality 

The faith of ancient Israel and of the early Christian communities is explored in order to draw from 
them the grounding for a contemporary biblical spirituality. Attention is given to biblical images for 
God, the various modes of prayer and worship, and the ethical demands for justice and peace in 
the biblical world and in our own 

e 4521 Integrating Seminar: Biblical Spirituality Program 

This seminar integrates experience in the biblical study and travel programs and courses at CTU, 
ministerial background and personal ideals, and contemporary questions for a holistic biblical 
spirituality. Restricted to participants from the CTU study and travel program. 

BC 5001 The Servant of the Lord and Interpretation 

An extensive introduction to the text and themes of Deutero-lsaiah is followed by the study of the 
sayings about the Servant of the Lord, in relation to their meaning for the vocation of Israel and for 
that of people called to be God's servant. Reapplications of the servant theme in the New 
Testament are considered to the extent possible. 

BC 5002 Women in the Scriptures 

An advanced seminar in feminist approaches to the scriptures, examining texts from the canonical 
as well as some non-canonical literature. 

B 5005 Messianic Expectation in Early Judaism 

This course is a seminar on messianism as it developed in ancient Israel and early Judaism in light 
of the Christian confession of Jesus as the Messiah. 

BC 5010 Bible, Mission, and Culture 

An examination of the grounds for, and models of, mission in the Bible, and of some issues in 
mission and culture. In even years the course is limited to the Old Testament; in odd years the entire 
Bible is considered. 

BC 5012 Latina Perspectives on Biblical Interpretation 

A seminar on the work of women theologians in the U.S.A. and in Latin America, with attention to 
Latina feminist/mujerista methods for interpreting scripture and insights for preaching and teaching 
from the scriptures in a multicultural church. 

6 5120 Seminar: Church in the New Testament 

Explores the different perceptions and images of the church in the New Testament canon. 
Structures of communal organization, worship, and ministry, as well as the diversity in both theology 
and praxis are investigated. 



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Course Offerings 



B 5201 Gospel of John from the Greek 

This course is a careful exegesis of the Greek text of the gospel that stresses John's unique 
language, literary style, and iheology. Students also explore the social-historical context of the 
Johannine community. 

B 5305 Passion Narratives 

Study of the four Gospel Passion and Resurrection accounts, using a variety of approaches to 
biblical interpretation. Attention is given to how the various interpretations of the violent death of 
Jesus can help stop cycles of violence in contemporary contexts. 

B 5400 Intertestamental Literature 

A seminar focusing on non-canonical Jewish literature produced from 200 B.C. to A.D. 200. 
Emphasis on the impact of these writings on the theology of early Christianity and rabbinic Judaism. 

B 5423 Jewish-Christian Relations 

The course covers the history and current state of Christian/Jewish Relations and focuses on recent 
documents issued by both religious bodies. 

BD 5510 Feminist Hermeneutics in Bible and Theology 

A team-taught seminar that investigates biblical texts and doctrinal themes such as God, Christ, 
Trinity, creation, theological anthropology, sin and evil, Mary, church, and ministry from a feminist 
perspective. 

B 5511 Fundamentalist Biblical Interpretation 

A seminar focusing on the origins of fundamentalism and its approach to biblical interpretation with 
an attempt to formulate a pastoral response to the theological stance and proselytizing efforts of 
fundamentalists. 

B 5512 Biblical Methods 

This seminar investigates several methods currently used to interpret biblical texts. These methods, 
with their underlying presuppositions and interpretive possibilities, are employed in the examination 
of various texts and evaluated for their effectiveness in opening up the meaning of the scriptures. 

BC 5515 Forms and Meanings in Bible and Culture 

The course examines themes that recur in cultures and in the First Testament in order to see how 
anthropology and biblical studies can enlighten each other as well as the missionary/theological 
enterprise. 



DEPARTMENT OF CROSS-CULTURAL MINISTRIES (CCM) 

Roger Schroeder, S.V.D., Chair, Scott Alexander, Mictiel Andraos, Rev. Claude-Marie Barbour, 
Eleanor Doidge, L.o.B., Anthony Gittins, C.S.Sp., Gary Riebe-Estrella, S.V.D. 

C 4001 Crossing Cultural Boundaries: Ministry at the Margins (CC-R) 

Who are we, what are we doing, and why? Everyone has a particular social location, assumptions, 
and expectations, which they bring to ministry. Examines culture, religion, faith, encounter — and the 
call to conversion — as constitutive of marginal and boundary-breaking ministry. 

C 4002 Abraham's Children: Jews, Christians, and Muslims (CC-R) 

A cross-cultural and comparative introduction to Judaism, Christianity, and Islam using historical, 
theological, and ethnographic methodologies. 



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Course Offerings 



C 4100 Inculturation and Dialogue: Ministry Across Boundaries 

Building upon and integrating previous studies and experiences, this course enables students to 
attend more closely to the contexts, in which they minister, particularly when the cultural/social 
contexts and the ideological or faith convictions they encounter are not their own. 

DC 4200 Christology and Culture 

An investigation of the meaning of the person and work of Jesus Christ for Christian faith today. 
Special emphasis given to emerging christologies in the World Church, constructing christologies 
today, and the final consummation of all things in Christ. 

MPC 4300 Pastoral Challenges of Cultural Diversity 

Cultural diversity is a growing phenomenon in the new global context. By engaging participants in 
an intercultural learning process, this course prepares pastoral leaders to deal with challenges of 
cultural diversity in their communities. 

CH 4301 Constants in Context: A Mission Theology for Today 

Weaving together a systematic theology with mission at its core and a global history of the world 
Christian movement, this course traces the patterns by which theological constants are shaped in 
changing contexts in developing relevant mission theologies. 

CH 4302 Earliest Christian Traditions in Asia 

An investigation of earliest Christian contacts with Asian cultures and traditions along the "silk" 
routes (land and sea), beginning with the apostle Thomas to 1500 C.E. It distinguishes facts, 
legends, and hypotheses as a framework for assessing such contacts. 

MPC 4308 Pastoral Care in an African-American Context 

This course explores the psychological and cultural elements that contributed to the formation of 
an African-American identity. The goal is a better understanding of the African-American experience 
and a greater sensitivity to the strength and needs of this cultural tradition. Students develop a better 
understanding/ability to minister in the African-American community. 

C 4310 Mission Integration 

Integrating seminar for those returning from cross-cultural and/or overseas training placements 
(OTP) of mission/ministry. This course provides a process for deeper understanding of the 
experience through theological reflection and integration of the past, present, and future. 

CH 4310 History of the World Christian Movement in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries 

The end of the French Revolution marked the beginning of a period during which Christianity 
eventually developed into a vibrant world movement. This course examines historical-theological 
models of mission and related contemporary issues within varied social-political, religious, and 
ecclesial contexts. 

DC 4311 Introduction to Asian Theologies (CC-R) 

As Christianity becomes post-western, the church in Asia will have an increasingly significant role in 
the church of the future. This course is an introduction to the theology emerging from the Asian 
church. It begins by looking at the context of Asia and then explores how theology addresses the 
realities of the many poor, many religions, and many cultures of Asia. 

C4320 Islam 

This introduction to the faith tradition of nearly one-fifth of humanity includes: the life of Muhammad (s.); 



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Course Offerings 



Qur'an and hadith; the five "pillars" of Muslim praxis; Islamic law and theology; Sunni/Shi'ite 
sectarianism; mysticism; and contemporary Muslim renewal and reform movements. 

C 4321 The Qur'an 

This course explores the role that the Qur'an plays in Muslim consciousness by focusing on such 
topics as: the function of the text in Muslim piety; biblical-Quranic intertextuality; Quranic commentary 
and exegesis; and the Qur'an as oral/aural scripture. 

C 4325 Introduction to Judaism 

Designed to introduce the most important aspects of Jewish practice and belief, particularly stresses 
questions and problems relevant to contemporary Jews, while setting them within a historical 
context. Considers issues in the relationship between Judaism and Christianity, including the dialogue 
that has developed in recent decades. 

C 4326 Developments in Mission Theology 

Mission theologies are formal accounts of different missionary strategies and tactics over time and 
space, which are varied and changing. Survey selected approaches (classically and in the 
contemporary world), identifying strengths, weaknesses, assumptions, implications, and applications 
to your own ministry. 

C 4330 Interreligious Dialogue 

Participants investigate forms of dialogue with other religions developed in Catholic Christianity 
since Vatican II. Attention is given to the dialogue of religious experience and a comparative 
theology arising from the practice of dialogue. Field trips and various media formats are employed. 

CE 4400 Mission and Peacemaking 

Systemic violence (social, cultural, economic, political, and ecological) is globally widespread. 
Drawing on Catholic social teaching, theology of peace, and some contextual pastoral experiences, 
this course helps students develop a theological and pastoral vision for the praxis of social 
peacemaking. 

BC 4403 Mark in Cross-Cultural Perspective 

A study of the narrative of Mark from a cultural and theological perspective. Focus is on Markan style 
and theology in dialogue with the Jewish background and with the contexts and questions of today. 

CD 4430 Doing Theology in the Context of Migrations 

This course is dedicated to the elaboration of a theology that deals with the reality of migrations 
particularly in the U.S.A. Participants are exposed to the complexity of this phenomenon through 
the analysis of theories that explore the reasons why people migrate and the historical, political, 
legal, cultural, and social dynamics of international migration in the U.S.A. Issues of ethnicity, race, 
and gender are emphasized. Particular attention given to the human and religious experience of 
the migrants. Students are required to critically relate the reality of migration with the Christian 
revelation and traditions. Examines the experience of migration as depicted by the Bible, church 
documents, and theologies that deal with the contemporary and diverse experience of migrants 
within the U.S.A. 

BC 4502 Reading the Bible Differently: African-American Biblical Perspectives 

Different contexts and perspectives lead to different approaches to, and interpretation of, the Bible. 
This course studies the interplay between the African-American contexts and the resulting 
appropriation and interpretation of the Bible. Participants are inducted into the wider issue of social 
location in biblical hermeneutics. 



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Course Offerings 



BC 4503 Perspectives in African Biblical Interpretation 

After an introduction into the African culture and context, the approaches, themes, and texts in 
current African biblical interpretation are studied. Participants are introduced to the question of text 
and context in interpretation. 

C 4700 Praxis for Cross-Cultural Transformation 

A J-term Intensive course (inspired by Paulo Freire's methodology) prepares students for ecumenical, 
cross-cultural mission/ministry, and consists of preparation, field experience, and integration. Field 
experience: January (Chiapas or Chicago), May/June (Lakota Reservations). Additional costs 
involved depending on location. 

BC 5001 Tfie Servant of the Lord and Interpretation ''' 

An extensive introduction to the text and themes of Deutero-lsaiah is followed by the study of the 
sayings about the Servant of the Lord, in relation to their meaning for the vocation of Israel and for 
that of people called to be God's servant. Reapplications of the servant theme in the New Testament 
are considered to the extent possible. 

DC 5001 Catholicism, U.S. Culture, and the Mission of the Church 

An investigation of the history of Catholicism in the United States, how it has interfaced with U.S. 
culture, and what implications this has for the missionary nature of the church in the U.S. context. 

BC 5002 Women in the Scriptures 

An advanced seminar in feminist approaches to the scriptures, examining texts from the canonical 
as well as some non-canonical literature. 

CS 5010 Spirituality, Ministry, and Survivors of Human Rights Abuse 

The prevalence of torture, human rights abuses, and violence in our world challenges the 
missionary/minister to understand the personal and societal effects of trauma and to develop a 
spirituality of accompaniment with survivors in their healing and reconciliation. Not open to audit. 

BC 5010 Bible, Mission, and Culture 

An examination of the grounds for, and models of, mission in the Bible, and of some issues in 
mission and culture. In even years the course is limited to the Old Testament; in odd years the entire 
Bible is considered. 

BC 5012 Latina Perspectives on Biblical Interpretation 

A seminar on the work of women theologians in the U.S.A. and in Latin America, with attention to 
Latina feminist/mujerista methods for interpreting scripture and insights for preaching and teaching 
from the scriptures in a multicultural church. 

CS 5020 Spirituality, Discipleship, and Mission Today 

This course explores discipleship in the New Testament, seeking its applications amid changing 
lives and in a changing world. First, we are called, then sent; the initiative and the agenda are not 
our own. Ponder the implications and applications. ■ : 

SC 5020 Hispanic Spirituality: History and Religiosity 

Provides a general introduction to the foundations, beliefs, and challenges of Hispanic/Latino 
spirituality. The course covers topics like: Mesoamerican and medieval Spanish religiosity; what 
Latinos believe about God, Mary, humanity, evil, etc.; and finally, the challenge of evangelizing 
popular religiosity and of enhancing Latino interest in the Word of God, justice, and liberation. 



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Course Offerings 



CS 5030 The Spirituality of Lakota-Christian Dialogue 

In dialogue with Lakota Native Americans who practice traditional spirituality and/or Christian faith, 
this course examines a spirituality of justice and interfaith mission/ministry. Includes a week-long 
field trip on Rosebud and Pine Ridge Lakota Reservations in South Dakota. 

SC 5040 Islamic Mysticism and Spirituality 

An exploration of the Muslim traditions of piety, devotion, and spiritual purification known as "Sufism." 
Topics include: early Muslim asceticism; love mysticism; sobriety and ecstasy; the stages and states 
of the spiritual journey; Sufi prayer and praxis; and classical Sufi poetry. 

C 5041 Contemporary Islamic Renewal and Reform Movements 

A thoughtful perspective on what is popularly called Islamic "fundamentalism." This course examines 
the phenomenon as a response to the effects of western modernity and modernism. It also explores 
the spectrum of such movements ranging from progressive to extremist. 

WC 5200 Advanced Preaching 

This practicum addresses specific pastoral and cultural contexts for preaching, e.g. preaching 
specific sacramental rites (weddings and funerals), preaching various aspects of the church year 
(a cycle of the lectionary or particular feasts and seasons), or preaching in distinctive cultural 
contexts (Hispanic or Asian). Prerequisite: Liturgical Preaching, W4204 

WC 5202 Liturgical Inculturation 

This seminar explores the inculturation of the church's worship in both historical and contemporary 
perspective with emphasis on current methodological and theological issues raised by the 
engagement of the church with contemporary cultures promoted by Vatican II. 

WC 5205 Liturgy in a Multicultural Community 

This seminar explores the complex situation of liturgical celebration in communities comprising 
people of diverse languages and cultural backgrounds. It takes up the dynamics of intercultural 
engagement, assumptions and principles relating to multiculturalism, liturgy, and popular religiosity, 
conceptual and practical groundwork, and models for liturgy that embrace the plurality of cultures 
in a respectful, inclusive way. 

WC 5208 Eucharist in Cross-Cultural Context 

An anthropological-liturgical study of the Eucharist to uncover possible universals for relating 
western eucharistic tradition to symbolism and life-experience of other cultures and to sketch issues 
and principles for shaping Eucharist cross-culturally. Prerequisite: Sacraments II, W4201. 

DC 5310 Interreligious Dialogue in Asia 

Explores the theory and praxis of interreligious dialogue, including the influence of personal, social, 
and extra-religious factors. Taking into account the contextual realities, the texts of Christian 
scriptures and teachings are investigated to discern the church's theology of religions. 

DC 5311 Readings in Asian Theology 

This is a reading course on the writings of key Christian theologians — especially on how they 
address the issues arising from the context and realities of Asia. Among the major themes examined 
from an Asian perspective are post-colonialism, contextualization, hermeneutics, theological methods, 
inculturation, integral liberation, and interreligious dialogue. 



A Graduate School of Theology and Ministry 21 



Course Offerings 



CH 5322 The History of Muslim-Christian Relations 

An investigation of Christian-Muslim relations from the early seventh century Common Era to the 
present. Specific topics include: the early Muslim conquests, the Crusades, the fall of Constantinople, 
the Bosnian genocide, twentieth-century Algeria, and contemporary Nigeria, Indonesia, and the U.S. 

BC 5515 Forms and Meanings in Bible and Culture 

The course examines themes that recur in cultures and in the First Testament in order to see how 
anthropology and biblical studies can enlighten each other as well as the missionary/theological 
enterprise. 

DC 6000 Theological Anthropology in Intercultural Perspective 

A doctoral seminar in emerging issues in theological anthropology in the World Church today, as 
well as new challenges to the Christian understanding of the human being. Emphasis is placed on 
the different contexts in which these issues and challenges are encountered. 

C 6001 I ncuitu ration 

Much misunderstood, inculturation will be carefully explicated, theoretically and practically. Study 
methods by which Christianity and a culture may actually encounter each other. The outcome 
(with the Spirit and local people) is a new reality: the People of God Transformed. 



DEPARTMENT OF HISTORICAL AND DOCTRINAL STUDIES (HDS) 

Thomas Nairn, O.F.M., Chair, Stephen Bevans, S.V.D., Edmund Chia, Archie Fornasari, M.C.C.J., 

Zachary Hayes, O.F.M., Dawn Nothwehr, O.S.F, John Pawlikowski, O.S.M. 

Amanda Quantz, Robert Schreiter C.PP.S. 

Historical Studies 

H 4001 Patristics 

A study of the theological perspectives of major writers of the church. 

H 4002 The Middle Ages and the Reformation 

Study Gregory the Great (600) to the Council of Trent (1545-563), focusing on the development of 
the medieval church, relations between east and west, history of theology, breakdown of the 
medieval synthesis, and the significance of major reformers. 

H 4003 From Trent to Vatican II 

Explore key issues in Catholicism of the last four centuries: the mentality following the Reformation, 
Jansenism, Newman and the Oxford movement, forces influencing Vatican I, Modernism and its 
reaction, pertinent problems of the twentieth century 

H 4300 Byzantine Influences through Church History 

Take an intellectual journey through the lands of eastern Christianity. Examines church history 
through the Byzantine influences that shaped the church from the sixth through fifteenth centuries. 
Topics include key cities and holy sites such as Edessa, Constantinople, Ravenna, Mount Athos, 
and Hagia Sofia. 

CH 4301 Constants in Context: A Mission Theology for Today 

Weaving together a systematic theology with mission at its core and a global history of the world 
Christian movement, this course traces the patterns by which theological constants are shaped in 
changing contexts in developing relevant mission theologies. 

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Course Offerings 



CH 4302 Earliest Christian Traditions in Asia 

An investigation of earliest Christian contacts with Asian cultures and traditions along the "silk" 
routes (land and sea), beginning with the apostle Thomas to 1500 C.E. It distinguishes facts, legends, 
and hypotheses as a framework for assessing such contacts. ., 

H 4310 The Divine Comedy and the World of Dante 

Vernacular languages launched a revolution in medieval literature. This interdisciplinary course 
examines historical factors at work in and around Dante's Divine Comedy, especially the medieval 
sacral worldview and the theological tenets that characterize the high Middle Ages. 

CH 4310 History of the World Christian Movement in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries 

The end of the French Revolution marked the beginning of a period during which Christianity 
eventually developed into a vibrant world movement. This course examines historical-theological 
models of mission and related contemporary issues within varied social-political, religious, and 
ecclesial contexts. 

SH 4340 History and Spirituality of the Franciscan Movement 

This course covers the historical development of the Franciscan Family begun by Francis and Clare 
of Assisi and their perspective on Gospel living. It considers the spirituality that has inspired 
reformations within the family and moved the brothers and sisters into ministry, taking into account 
the three Orders begun by Francis as well as the contemporary so-called "Fourth Order." 

H 5050 Local Church History: An Interdisciplinary Method for Narrative Scholarship 

Learn a holistic method for studying history through the richness and diversity of local churches across 
time, throughout the world. This course examines the varieties of interrelationships between literary 
texts, images, music, architecture, devotions, traditions, and the communities that claim them. 

CH 5322 The History of Muslim-Christian Relations 

An investigation of Christian-Muslim relations from the early seventh century Common Era to 
the present. Specific topics include: the early Muslim conquests, the Crusades, the fall of 
Constantinople, the Bosnian genocide, twentieth-century Algeria, and contemporary Nigeria, 
Indonesia, and the U.S. 

Doctrinal Studies 

D 4001 Doing Systematic Theology (CC-A) 

This course investigates the nature and methods of systematic theology. After defining theology 
according to Anselm of Canterbury's classic definition of "faith seeking understanding," the course draws 
implications for doing systematic theology in today's context (Part I), and explores how systematic 
theology is done as a communal, ecclesial enterprise, in conversation with Christian tradition and the 
church's teaching office (Part II). It then investigates the various sources of positive theology, surveys 
the methods of speculative theological reflection, and examines various theological texts (e.g., of 
patristic, scholastic, neo-orthodox, or liberation theology) in terms of the methods employed. 

DB 4100 Witness and Proclamation: The God of Jesus Christ 

This course has as its content reflection on the God whom Christians proclaim and to whom 
Christians witness in mission and ministry. This God — Holy Mystery — is first manifest in human 
experience through the presence and power of the Holy Spirit, and made visible in the ministry and 
cross of Jesus of Nazareth. The doctrine of God as Trinity is addressed in terms of pastoral practice 
(P), method (A), particular contexts of cultures and religions (R), and the Christian tradition (T). 

A Graduate School of Theology and Ministry 23 



Course Offerings 



D 4200 Christology 

This course provides a systematic treatment of the foundations of Christology in a post-critical 
context. It is concerned with the possibility of constructing and evaluating Christology after one has 
subjected the Bible to the analysis of historical-critical studies, and after one has become thoroughly 
aware of the profound historicity of the Christian faith-community and its doctrines. 

DC 4200 Christology and Culture 

An investigation of the meaning of the person and work of Jesus Christ for Christian faith today. 
Special emphasis given to emerging christologies in the World Church, constructing christologies 
today, and the final consummation of all things in Christ. 

D 4201 Ecclesiology 

This course consists of an historical and systematic study of the understanding of the church in the 
Christian tradition and in contemporary thought. Special attention is given to ecclesiological themes 
and issues which are critical for life in the church today. 

DC 4311 Introduction to Asian Theologies (CC-R) 

As Christianity becomes post-western, the church in Asia will have an increasingly significant role in 
the church of the future. This course is an introduction to the theology emerging from the Asian 
church. It begins by looking at the context of Asia and then explores how theology addresses the 
realities of the many poor, many religions, and many cultures of Asia. 

D 4320 Mary and the Christian Tradition 

This course provides an overview of the place of Mary within the Christian tradition through an 
historical survey of Mary as found in scripture, in later theological reflection and development 
(dogma), liturgical celebration, and literature and art. The Gospel presentations of the role and 
significance of Mary are foundational religious expressions which are, in turn, articulated by people 
in other times, places, and cultural contexts. An understanding of Mary requires a basic knowledge 
of the symbols used to express her place in the faith of the church as well as the reflections upon 
those symbols in the various cultural contexts of the people of God. 

CD 4430 Doing Theology in the Context of Migrations 

This course is dedicated to the elaboration of a theology that deals with the reality of migrations 
particularly in the U.S.A. Participants are exposed to the complexity of this phenomenon through 
the analysis of theories that explore the reasons why people migrate and the historical, political, 
legal, cultural, and social dynamics of international migration in the U.S.A. Issues of ethnicity, race, 
and gender are emphasized. Particular attention given to the human and religious experience of 
the migrants. Students are required to critically relate the reality of migration with the Christian 
revelation and traditions. Examines the experience of migration as depicted by the Bible, church 
documents, and theologies that deal with the contemporary and diverse experience of migrants 
within the U.S.A. 

DC 5001 Catholicism, U.S. Culture, and the Mission of the Church 

An investigation of the history of Catholicism in the United States, how it has interfaced with U.S. 
culture, and what implications this has for the missionary nature of the church in the U.S. context. 

D 5002 Theologies of a Personal God 

This seminar investigates the personal nature of God as expressed in the theologies of John Calvin, 
John McCleod Campbell, John Oman, Charles Hartshorne, Sallie McFague and Elizabeth Johnson. 



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Course Offerings 



D 5003 The Creed in the Christian Tradition 

This seminar will investigate the nature and function of creeds in the history of Christianity. It will be 
based on a careful reading of Jarisalv Pelikan's masterwork, Credo: Historical and Theological 
Guide to Creeds and Confessions of Faith in the Christian Tradition. 

D 5004 Theology of Religious Pluralism 

With the explosion of information in the last half century on the world's religious traditions, it is 
untenable for religions to continue existing and doing theology independently of one another. This 
course explores the various Christian approaches to the phenomenon of religious pluralism, taking 
note especially of the creative tension pluralism generates and the insights it produces for the 
development of a more contextual Christianity. 

D 5100 Catholic Theology in the Twentieth Century 

Within a survey of theologians and theological movements in the century since 1919, special focus 
is given to the 1920s, the years leading to Vatican II, and the years since the Council. Particular 
attention given to theologians Yves Congar and Karl Rahner. 

D 5101 God and the Mystery of Human Suffering 

Participants in this seminar study key texts in the Christian tradition which address God's relation to 
suffering people. Among the thinkers studied are the author of Job, Aquinas, Julian of Norwich, 
Wiesel, Moltmann, Gutierrez, Schillebeeckx, Johnson, and John Paul II. 

D 5205 Theology of Karl Rahner 

A study of the major issues in Rahner's theology from the perspective of his philosophical 
background. 

DC 5310 Interreligious Dialogue in Asia 

Explores the theory and praxis of interreligious dialogue, including the influence of personal, social, 
and extra-religious factors. Taking into account the contextual realities, the texts of Christian 
scriptures and teachings are investigated to discern the church's theology of religions. 

DC 5311 Readings in Asian Theology 

This is a reading course on the writings of key Christian theologians — especially on how they 
address the issues arising from the context and realities of Asia. Among the major themes examined 
from an Asian perspective are post-colonialism, contextualization, hermeneutics, theological 
methods, inculturation, integral liberation, and interreligious dialogue. 

BD 5510 Feminist Hermeneutics in Bible and Theology 

A team-taught seminar that investigates biblical texts and doctrinal themes such as God, Christ, 
Trinity, creation, theological anthropology, sin and evil, Mary, church, and ministry from a feminist 
perspective. 

DC 6000 Theological Anthropology in Intercultural Perspective 

A doctoral seminar in emerging issues in theological anthropology in the World Church today, as 
well as new challenges to the Christian understanding of the human being. Emphasis is placed on 
the different contexts in which these issues and challenges are encountered. 



A Graduate School of Theology and Ministry 25 



Course Offerings 



Ethical Studies 

E4001 Living the Moral Life (CC-A) 

Introduction to the basic themes of the Christian moral life including its personal, social, and cosmic 
dimensions. Using classical texts and contemporary case studies, the course focuses on the 
particular sources, authorities, and methods of the Roman Catholic ethical tradition. Particular 
attention given to the relationship between methods of systematic theology and ethical methods. 

EMP 4100 Justice, Peace, the Integrity of Creation and Reconciliation: Living the Values of 
the Reign of God 

Students are introduced to Catholic social teaching and equipped for committed Christian ministry 
with peoples struggling for justice and yearning for reconciliation in an ecologically threatened and 
violent world. The particular disciplines emphasized are those of social ethics and pastoral ministry. 

E 4200 Ethics of Power and Racism 

When ethical norms are articulated in a field of power, they often construct a moral/immoral binary, 
effectively constructing morality's "other." This course explores the numerous ways that, particularly 
white northern Europeans created and sustained such norms. The result was various forms of 
colonization and enslavement of those defined as "other" which had the effect of forming, shaping, 
and sustaining racism, that has continued until the present day. 

E 4205 Natural Law of Christian Ethics 

A survey of the relevance of some western and non-western natural law traditions in view of 
establishing a vision of a universal common good that can generate a Christian ethical discourse 
capable of intercultural and interreligious communication. 

E 4207 Ethical Significance of Christian Humanism 

A critical study of the debate about the existence and nature of Christian humanism and its relevance 
for the ethos and mission of the church. 

E 4208 Proclaiming Shalom in a Violent World 

How does the church understand and actuate its mediatory role between God's offer of peace in 
Christ and the search for peace on the part of the human community? The question is approached 
historically and systematically. 

E 4310 Christ, Community, and the Moral Life 

This course is designed to study the implications of Christology for the life of the Christian community 
as an ethical community in an increasingly secular, scientific, culturally, and religiously pluralistic world. 

E4315 Medical Ethics 

A study of the relation of general ethical principles and methods to the concerns of the medical 
profession. Among topics treated are experimentation with human subjects, organ transplantation, 
genetic engineering, in vitro fertilization, access to health care, and the interrelationships between 
the rights of patients, doctors, and society. 

E 4342 World Poverty, Development, and Life's Liberation 

Investigates and assesses the world's division into rich and poor countries. Studies poverty, 
development, and liberation in the light of scripture and Catholic social teaching using today's kairos 
for Christian communities as focus. 



26 Catholic TnKoixKiK al Union 



Course Offerings 



E 4344 Global Economic Justice and Christian Faith 

We dare not provide an ethic of economic life that is not in strict relation to an ethic of political life 
and an ethic of communication. A Christian ethic must test its claims to normativity by the difference 
it makes for these interrelationships. ^ 

E 4345 Spirituality, Liturgy, and the Quest for Justice 

An examination of how classic and contemporary spiritualities incorporate justice into their 
framework. The Ignatian Exercises and feminist and ecological forms of spirituality are analyzed 
along with key figures such as Thomas Merton. Considers authentic ways in which justice can be 
incorporated into liturgical celebration. 

E 4400 Care for the Earth: Ethics and the Environment 

This course focuses on the need for Christians to reverence the environment and the behaviors 
that need to follow from that reverence. Various environmental ethics methods are explored. 
Christian and Jewish sources, especially the Franciscan tradition and Catholic magisterial 
statements are plumbed. . --^ ' , v 

CE 4400 Mission and Peacemaking 

Systemic violence (social, cultural, economic, political, and ecological) is globally widespread. 
Drawing on Catholic social teaching, theology of peace, and contextual pastoral experiences, this 
course helps students develop a theological and pastoral vision for the praxis of social peacemaking. 

E 4405 Sexual Ethics for the Christian 

A study of sexuality and sexual behavior, especially in unmarried Christians. It investigates the moral 
tradition, the elements which form a contemporary Christian vision of sexuality, and how these relate 
to sexual conduct. i 

E 4406 Marriage as a Sacramental Life 

This course examines the development of the theology of marriage in the Roman Catholic tradition. 
Special attention is given to the sacramental character of marriage, dimensions of married life, and 
the importance of fidelity. 

E 5100 Holocaust and Genocide: Ethical Reflections 

An examination of major ethical issues arising within the Nazi Holocaust. Topics include anti- 
Semitism, the loss of personal morality, God and ethical decision making, the importance of ritual in 
shaping ethical behavior, ethics and unjust structures, and human rights. Ethical issues in modern 
genocides such as Rwanda, Bosnia, and Cambodia are also considered. 

E 5101 Ethics and Emotions 

In the Catholic moral tradition, theologians have often perceived emotions as hindrances in ethical 
decision making. This course asks whether such a perception is valid and attempts to articulate 
a framework for understanding the interrelation between the Christian's emotional and moral life. 

E 5102 Ambiguity in Moral Decision Making 

A critical assessment of the ways in which recent appropriations of the Roman Catholic moral 
tradition have dealt with ambiguous cases. Among the areas covered are the principle of double 
effect (with its direct/indirect distinction), the methodology of basic goods, proportionalism, 
and casuistry. - , 



A Graduate School of Theology and Ministn 27 



Course Offerings 



E 5105 Christian Perspectives on War and Peace 

An examination of perspectives on war and peace within the Christian tradition. Both histohcal 
position and contemporary outlooks are considered. Special attention is given to the developments 
within Catholicism since the U.S. Bishop's Pastoral Letter as well as church statements since the 
Gulf War. 

E 5200 Ethics and Christian Adult Relationships 

This course explores the ethical dimensions of Christian adult relationships. Humans are formed 
and shaped in the moral life by their relationships and commitments. Topics such as just love, 
fidelity, commitment, and mutuality are explored. Beginning with the patristic period to the present, 
the work of saints, prophets, and martyrs is examined for what they teach us about the moral 
meaning of adult. Christian, faithful, committed relationships. 

E 5201 Mutuality: Definition and Probative Value 

Underlying most discussions about power are assumptions that are ruled by dualism which 
alienates men/women, humans/nature, affect/reason, personal/social, and sacred/secular. This 
course defines "mutuality" and explores the difference it makes when used within a Christian ethical 
framework. 

E 5204 Love and Justice 

Various ethical systems have developed around the central theme of love or of justice or their 
interaction. Differences in the understanding of these concepts constitute different approaches to 
morality. This seminar analyzes, compares, and critically assesses the ways in which these themes 
function in Christian ethics and theology. 

E 5205 Ethics and Moral Pluralism Seminar 

Moral pluralism has been a defining factor in moral reflection. This seminar explores recent work on 
the prospects for a common morality using philosophical analysis of pluralism, examining human 
rights as a kind of common morality, and studying Hans Kung's Global Ethic and the Parliament of 
World Religions. Special attention is given to Catholic moral theological issues raised by these 
discussions. 

E 5210 Seminar on Politics and Christian Conscience 

An exploration of the relation of Christian life to political life. The origin, place, and role of 
conscience in both are investigated. Conscience is related to the historical realities of community 
and traditions and to the unity of theory and practice in the exercise of political conscience. 

E 5215 Religion and the Shaping of Public Ethical Values 

A seminar studying the public role of religion in shaping values in global society. Church-state 
relations and human rights are considered. 

E 5220 Revolution and Liberation: Ethical Perspectives 

An examination of various interpretations of revolution and liberation in classical western political 
philosophy, Third World thought, and present-day theological and ethical literature. Special attention 
is given to Latin American liberation theology. 

E 5320 The Making of Moral Theology 

This course is an overview of the development of Catholic moral theology from the patristic period to 
the present. Special attention given to the directions and concerns of Catholic morality since the 
Second Vatican Council. 



28 Catholic Thkolocjk al Union 



Course Offerings 



DEPARTMENT OF SPIRITUALITY AND PASTORAL MINISTRY (SPM) 

Gilberto Cavazos-Gonzalez, O.F.M., Chair, Mary Frohlich, R.S.C.J., Carmen Nanko 

Spirituality Studies 

S 4001 Spiritual Companioning for Ministry (CC-P) 

This course provides foundational understanding and experience of being with others within 
a spiritual companioning context. It focuses on the art and ministry of spiritual companioning and 
the practical applications in diverse ministerial settings. Issues such as listening skills, reverence of 
individual differences, and discernment are explored. The course design includes input, discussion, 
and practicum. - - 

WS 4100 Liturgy, Prayer, and Contemplation: Ecclesial Spirituality 

This course helps students integrate and communicate an understanding of individual and 
communal prayer as formation for and the result of apostolic action. Reading, discussion, lecture, 
and practical exercises. : 

S 4310 Spiritual Classics of the Early Church 

Study of selections from the most influential spiritual writings of the second to sixth centuries: 
Ignatius of Antioch, Origen, Gregory of Nyssa, Athanasius, Desert Fathers and Mothers, Benedict, 
Augustine, Pseudo-Dionysius, and others. 

S 4311 Spirituality of Lay Vocation and Ministry 

This intensive addresses the concept of vocation and ministry as it impacts all who identify 
themselves as disciples of Jesus Christ, with special emphasis on the role of the laity in the Roman 
Catholic church. Explores the history of the laity in the church and develops both a theology and 
spirituality of lay ministry based on contemporary scholarship and the lived experience of lay 
ministers in a variety of settings. 

S 4312 Theology and Practice of Prayer 

The course is an introduction to traditional and contemporary methods of Christian prayer and 
its stages of development. The process entails learning from some of the great teachers of prayer 
within the Christian tradition, as well as drawing insights from the contribution of other religious 
traditions. Provides the theological grounding necessary to evaluate and critique prayer practices 
and interweaves theory and praxis. 

SH 4340 History and Spirituality of the Franciscan Movement 

This course covers the historical development of the Franciscan Family begun by Francis and Clare 
of Assisi and their perspective on Gospel living. It considers the spirituality that has inspired 
reformations within the family and moved the brothers and sisters into ministry, taking into account 
the three orders begun by Francis as well as the contemporary so-called "Fourth Order." 

BS 4520 Biblical Foundations of Spirituality 

The faith of ancient Israel and of the early Christian communities is explored in order to draw from 
them the grounding for a contemporary biblical spirituality. Attention is given to biblical images for 
God, the various modes of prayer and worship, and the ethical demands for justice and peace in the 
biblical world and in our own. 

CS 5010 Spirituality, Ministry, and Survivors of Human Rights Abuse 

The prevalence of torture, human rights abuses and violence in our world challenges the 

A Graduate School of Theology and Ministiy 29 



Course Offerings 



missionary/minister to understand the personal and societal effects of trauma and to develop a 
spirituality of accompaniment with survivors in their healing and reconciliation. Not open to audit. 

CS 5020 Spirituality, Discipleship, and Mission Today 

This course explores discipleship in the New Testament, seeking its applications amid changing 
lives and in a changing world. First, we are called, then sent; the initiative and the agenda are not 
our own. Ponder the implications and applications. 

SC 5020 Hispanic Spirituality: History and Religiosity 

Provides a general introduction to the foundations; beliefs, and challenges of Hispanic/Latino 
spirituality. The course covers topics like: Mesoamerican and medieval Spanish religiosity; what 
Latinos believe about God, Mary, humanity, evil, etc.; and finally, the challenge of evangelizing 
popular religiosity and of enhancing Latino interest in the Word of God, justice, and liberation. 

CS 5030 The Spirituality of Lakota-Christian Dialogue 

In dialogue with Lakota Native Americans who practice traditional spirituality and/or Christian faith, 
this course examines a spirituality of justice and interfaith mission/ministry. Includes a week-long 
field trip on Rosebud and Pine Ridge Lakota Reservations in South Dakota. 

SC 5040 Islamic Mysticism and Spirituality 

An exploration of the Muslim traditions of piety, devotion, and spiritual purification known as 
"Sufism." Topics include: early Muslim asceticism; love mysticism; sobriety and ecstasy; the stages 
and states of the spiritual journey; Sufi prayer and praxis; and classical Sufi poetry. 

S 5101 Foundations and Methods for the Study of Spirituality 

Defines spirituality as a field of study, explores the relationship between spiritual praxis and research 
in spirituality, surveys research methods, evaluates the notion of a "spiritual classic," and examines 
issues in the historical study of spirituality. 

S 5110 Spiritual Formation Seminar 

This course considers traditional and contemporary models and issues of Christian spiritual growth 
whether they take place at home, in the parish, in ecclesial movements, in religious life, in studies, 
or in secular places and situations. 

S 5212 Advanced Seminar in Spiritual Direction 

A seminar for those with experience practicing spiritual direction, the course involves reading and 
reflection of major theoretical perspectives on spiritual direction in the light of participants' ministry 
experiences. 

WS 5301 Patterns of Christian Prayer 

This seminar examines the historical development of non-eucharistic liturgical prayer from early 
Christian prayer patterns through the reforms of Vatican II. This historical-comparative approach 
provides the context for inquiring to what extent there is an implied spirituality in the form, structure, 
and performance of such prayer; and how this might be beneficial to contemporary prayer practice. 

S 5310 Spirituality for the New Millennium Seminar 

This seminar delineates the main lines of a spirituality which holds promise for the future as it 
emerges from the stories and the writings of the leading mediating figures of our time. 



30 Catholk Thix)ix)(.icai. Union 



Course Offerings 



Pastoral Ministry Studies 

EMP 4100 Justice, Peace, the Integrity of Creation and Reconciliation: Living the Values of 
the Reign of God 

Students are introduced to Catholic social teaching and equipped for committed Christian ministry 
with peoples struggling for justice and yearning for reconciliation in an ecologically threatened and 
violent world. The particular disciplines emphasized are those of social ethics and pastoral ministry. 

MP 4200 Human Development and Interpersonal Relations for Ministry 

Relying on case studies, various scenarios, and the student's life experiences that illustrate complex 
human dilemmas, this course explores an array of effective and ineffective ministerial actions and 
responses. Included are pertinent readings, engagement in group dialogue and role-play, skills at 
evaluating ministerial practice, and theological reflection. Designed for those seeking an integrative 
vision of pastoral ministry that blends theory and praxis, and offers knowledge for public ministers 
in contemporary practice of pastoral ministry in a variety of settings. 

MP 4275 Pastoral Ministry with the Dying and Grieving 

An examination of 1) transition and liminality as part of the human condition; 2) attachment as a 
human necessity and 3) grief as an inevitable consequence to a variety of loss experiences in 
situations persons present to the pastoral minister. 

MP 4280 Holistic Approaches to Crises in the Pastoral Setting 

Examine the meaning of health/illness, spiritual well-being/dark night, and emotional balance/mental 
illness in cultures of origin and ministry in order to respond appropriately to the complexity of 
situations in pastoral ministry settings. 

MPC 4300 Pastoral Challenges of Cultural Diversity 

Cultural diversity is a growing phenomenon in the new global context. By engaging participants in 
an intercultural learning process, this course prepares pastoral leaders to deal with challenges of 
cultural diversity in their communities. 

MP 4305 Family Dynamics in Pastoral Ministry Settings 

The sacraments reflect the many life-transitions of families. At these important family moments, the 
pastoral minister can positively influence family relationships. This course identifies healthy family 
functioning in the context of recent church social teachings, family systems theory, and examines 
ways to help families integrate the complexities of life into their lives of faith. 

MPC 4308 Pastoral Ministry in an African-American Context 

This course explores the psychological and cultural elements that contributed to the formation of 
an African-American identity. The goal is a better understanding of the African-American experience 
and a greater sensitivity to the strength and needs of this cultural tradition. Students develop a better 
understanding/ability to minister in the African-American community. 

MP 4310 Collaborative Skills for Administration in Ministry 

The workshops that constitute this course teach students how to be good stewards of the resources 
that come with ministry such as people, property, and money. The topics are leadership styles, 
workplace relationships, personnel issues, budgets and financial management, public relations 
and marketing, and stewardship and fundraising. 



A Graduate School of Theology and Ministry 31 



Course Offerings 



MPC 4360 Issues in Pastoral Ministry in the Hispanic Community 

Pastoral care in the Hispanic community raises issues specific to this particular faith community. 
This course examines those theologies, cultural practices, socio-economic realities, and gender 
roles that impact the faith-life and well-being of the Hispanic church. 

MP 5101 Leadership in Pastoral Ministry Settings 

Examine various models of leadership within scripture and non-theological sources in 

an effort to identify effective leadership styles. Strategies to deal with issues of power, relationality, 

motivation, group dynamics, conflict management, gender, and culture are examined. 

MP 5110 Special Issues in Pastoral Ministry 

This seminar addresses any one or combination of pastoral situations listed that require in depth 
study and a wide array of strategies for pastoral ministers intending to work with this population or 
who find themselves already working with this population. 

MPC 5410 Marriage and Family in a Cross-Cultural Context 

Marriage and family are building blocks of the Christian community. Still, across cultures there are 
diverse forms and patterns. Pastoral ministry and anthropology combine to uncover new insights 
and applications for pastors and missionaries. 

DEPARTMENT OF WORD AND WORSHIP (W/W) 
Rev. Richard Fragomeni, Chair, Eileen Crowley, Edward Foley, Capuchin, Richard McCarron, 

Gilbert Ostdiek, O.F.M. 

W 4001 Communication Skills for Ministry (CC-P) 

Examines the nature and dynamics of the human communication process as it applies to 1) oral 
interpretation of written texts; 2) rhetorical design and public discourse; 3) the use of mass media; 
4) interpersonal communication; and 5) non-verbal and ritual expressions. Attention is given to the 
cross-cultural and ministerial dimensions of these forms of communication. 

WS 4100 Liturgy, Prayer, and Contemplation: Ecclesial Spirituality 

This course helps students integrate and communicate an understanding of individual and 
communal prayer as formation for and the result of apostolic action. Reading, discussion, lecture, 
and practical exercises. 

W 4110 Holy Week: Liturgy, Preaching, and Presiding (CC-P) 

This course examines in an integrated fashion the liturgical celebrations of Holy Week, specifically 
Passion Sunday and the Triduum. It includes historical and theological study of Holy Week; 
celebration of and mystagogical reflection on the current rites; issues in preparing, preaching, and 
presiding during Holy Week and Triduum; the interplay of liturgical celebration and popular 
religiosity; and reflection on liturgical spirituality fostered through and from the rites. 

W 4200 Sacraments I: Initiation & Reconciliation 

Theological, historical, and pastoral reflection on the experience and sacraments of initiation and 
reconciliation. Particular attention given to: the RCIA as norm for initiatory practice; the relation of 
sacramental reconciliation to the church's life; and foundations of practical skills for celebration. 

W 4201 Sacraments II: Eucharist and Sacramental Theology 

This course serves as a general introduction to sacramental theology, and a particular introduction 
to the Eucharist, its history, theology, structure, and practice. 

32 Catholic Tni:()i.()(;i(Ai. Union 



Course Offerings 



W 4202 Presiding Practicum 

A practicum designed for priesthood candidates to develop competency in leadership of sacramental 
rites, including initiation, weddings, anointing, wakes, and funerals. Special emphasis given to 
Eucharist and Reconciliation. Prerequisite: Sacraments I and II 

W 4203 Liturgical Preaching 

This practicum examines the homily as a liturgical action within the Christian assembly. Participants 
consider liturgical, pastoral, cultural, and practical dynamics of preaching. 

W 4204 Canon Law 

An introductory course addressing the nature, role, and history of canon law; church structures and 
ministries; and law regulating sacramental practice. 

W 4205 Lay Leadership of Prayer and Preaching 

A practicum to develop competency in the leadership of the community's prayer, including Hours, 
catechumenal rites, the funeral Vigil, penitential liturgies, liturgies of Word and Communion, and 
ministry to the sick and dying. In conjunction with these settings, it will also consider the liturgical, 
canonical, and pastoral dynamics and practical skills of lay preaching in catechesis and worship. 
Prerequisite: Sacraments I or II 

W4240 Ritual Studies 

This seminar explores the ritual dimensions of liturgical celebration. Student presentations based on 
field observation and readings in ritual theory from various social sciences. 

BW 4500 Biblical Hermeneutics for Preaching 

An interdisciplinary course that introduces students to a process of integrating contemplation, 
biblical and theological study, and pastoral praxis for a ministry of preaching. Strongly recommended 
for all M.Div. students. 

W 5104 Worship in l\^edia Cultures 

Since the 1960s, some Catholic and Protestant churches have incorporated within their worship 
projected photographic, cinematic, graphic, and electronic media. This seminar introduces the 
history and current practices of churches integrating media in their "traditional," "contemporary," 
and "alternative" worship; differences between worship presentation media and liturgical media art; 
underpinning theories and theologies; and critical frameworks to evaluate local practices. 

W5105 Liturgical Year 

This seminar is designed as a theological, historical, cultural, and pastoral exploration of the church 
year through the lens of practical theology. 

W 5110 Holy Week: Liturgy, Preaching, and Presiding 

This course examines in an integrated fashion the liturgical celebrations of Holy Week, specifically 
Passion Sunday and the Triduum. It includes historical and theological study of Holy Week; 
celebration of and mystagogical reflection on the current rites; issues in preparing, preaching, and 
presiding during Holy Week and Triduum; the interplay of liturgical celebration and popular 
religiosity; and reflection on liturgical spirituality fostered through and from the rites. 

WC 5200 Advanced Preaching 

This practicum addresses specific pastoral and cultural contexts for preaching, e.g. preaching 
specific sacramental rites (weddings and funerals), preaching various aspects of the church year 

A Graduate School of Theology and Ministry 33 



Course Offerings 



(a cycle of the lectionary or particular feasts and seasons), or preaching in distinctive cultural 
contexts (Hispanic or Asian). Prerequisite: Liturgical Preaching, W4203 

WC 5202 Liturgical Inculturation 

This seminar explores the inculturation of the church's worship in both historical and contemporary 
perspective with emphasis on current methodological and theological issues raised by the 
engagement of the church with contemporary cultures promoted by Vatican II. 

WC 5205 Liturgy in a Multicultural Community 

This seminar explores the complex situation of liturgical celebration in communities comprising 
people of diverse languages and cultural backgrounds. It takes up the dynamics of intercultural 
engagement, assumptions and principles relating to multiculturalism, liturgy, and popular religiosity, 
conceptual and practical groundwork, and models for liturgy that embrace the plurality of cultures in 
a respectful, inclusive way. 

WC 5208 Eucharist in Cross-Cultural Context 

An anthropological-liturgical study of the Eucharist to uncover possible universals for relating 
western eucharistic tradition to symbolism and life-experience of other cultures and to sketch issues 
and principles for shaping Eucharist cross-culturally. Prerequisite: Liturgical Preaching, W4201. 

W 5210 Liturgical Catechesis 

Drawing upon the nature of liturgical celebration and principles of adult education, this seminar 
explores the nature and role of liturgical catechesis and mystagogy, and examines several models 
for experientially-based learning and formation for adult worshippers. 

W 5225 Liturgy and the Arts 

This cyclic seminar provides theological and liturgical foundations for reflecting on various liturgical 
arts, e.g., liturgical music, architecture and the shaping of places for worship, and contemporary 
media arts. 

W 5227 Shaping Places for Worship 

Using a range of media and methods, this seminar examines liturgical, spatial, artistic, and human 
issues involved in shaping places for worship. 

W 5230 Liturgical Methods 

This seminar is designed to introduce students to the major methodological trends in the field of 
liturgy through classic texts, which employ or describe these methods. Students engage both in the 
reading of the classic texts, and in the exploration of the strengths and weakness of the various 
methods by applying them to a study of eucharistic prayers. 

W 5240 Liturgical History 

This course provides an overview of Christian liturgy from its Jewish matrix until the present, 
especially in the west. It introduces significant movements, places, events, liturgical sources, and 
individuals that provide basic historical, social, cultural, and theological frameworks for 
understanding the development of Christian worship. 

WS 5301 Patterns of Christian Prayer 

This seminar examines the historical development of non-eucharistic liturgical prayer from early 
Christian prayer patterns through the reforms of Vatican II. This historical-comparative approach 
provides the context for inquiring to what extent there is an implied spirituality in the form, structure, 
and performance of such prayer; and how this might be beneficial to contemporary prayer practice. 

34 Catholic Thkolocical Union 



Course Offerings 



INTERDISCIPLINARY AND INTEGRATIVE STUDIES 

/ 4010 Healthy Human Sexual Development for Ministry 

Designed to raise awareness that sexuality is a constitutive part of the human person as a minister, 
this course assists ministers from any culture to own and integrate this concept. The impact of 
human sexuality and issues of power in all aspects of ministry are explored and students hone skills 
and gain confidence in integrating sexuality as part of ministerial identity. Among the ideas fostered 
are that sexuality is an expression of God-given goodness and one matures in self-understanding 
throughout life's journey. Team taught by men and women who are lay and religious, the major 
themes are: spirituality and sexuality; ethics of power and sexuality; psychology and sexuality; 
physiology, anatomy, and sexuality; and practical integration for ministry. (Taken in second year) 

I 4310 M.A.P.S. Colloquium 

This adult learning seminar for M.A.P.S. degree candidates facilitates the integration of ministry 
experience with the art form of theological reflection in ministry. 

15999 Capstone 

Designed as a culminating experience for M. Div. students, this seminar employs the methods of 
practical theology and is rooted in small group work. It helps students assess the extent of 
ministerial integration thus far, and plan for continuing integration after graduation. 

/ 6005 D. Min. Core I 

This beginning seminar for all beginning D.Min. students initiates the process of analyzing present 
ministerial practice to discern the embedded theologies. Participants are introduced to various 
theoretical frameworks to develop fluency as a practical theologian. 

/ 6010 D. Min. Core II 

The second required methods seminar for all D.Min. students, its dual purpose is to provide 
extended reflection on the nature of leadership and to help each student craft a defensible 
thesis-project proposal. 

Field Education 

M 4203 M.Div. Ministry Practicum 

M 4204 M.A.P.S. Ministry Practicum 

M 4205 M.Div. Summer Immersion Practicum 

M 4206 Oversees Training Program (OTP) 

M 4950 Clinical Pastoral Education (CPE) 



A Graduate School of Theology and Ministry 35 




CATHOLIC 

THEOLOGICAL 
UNION 



A {^nidiicitc school of thc'oloi>y and ministry 

5401 South Cornell Avenue Chieago, IL 60615 
Ph 773.324.8000 Fx 773.324.3414 Wehwww.etu.edu